Save T 24 Ustad Tiger Of Ranthambore From Captivity

Save T 24 Ustad Tiger Of Ranthambore From Captivity

We need freedom of Ustad

I am blessed with a Ustad’s #T24, I spent time with the Ustad that I can not forget in my life. Who brought me so close to nature,  I never see a gentle like a tiger in its natural habitat, and neither I have ever seen man nor animal . Ustad had nothing to do with anyone, he was just enjoying nature in its fun, and I was able to capture from the eye of my  lens.

Who says Ustad is a man eater. … Unfortunately, greedy people are putting on him allegations. …..

Manjot Singh

T24_3_m

Photo By Manjot Singh

On May 8, 2015, Rampal Saini, a Forest Guard at the Ranthambore Tiger Reserve, Rajashthan, was allegedly mauled and killed by a tiger, while he was patrolling the forest. The killing has been attributed to a male tiger T-24, christened Ustad, though no one saw the tiger commit the act. Some so-called local experts zeroed in on Ustad as the culprit, as he is known to be an aggressive tiger, with a history of previous alleged attacks. Many vested interests want this tiger removed:
1. Ranthambore tiger Reserve sees thousands of pilgrims walking through the park every Wednesday to visit a temple. This brings in a lot of money to local businesses.
2. Illegal grazing, logging, etc cannot continue in the reserve for fear of this aggressive tiger.
3. Someone is instigating the forest guards to strike work, and local leaders are threatening to create a law-and-order problem.
A local committee of so-called experts has persuaded the CM of Rajasthan to release an order for capture and relocation of this magnificent animal to a zoo. They have allegedly informed the CM that the tiger is a man-eater, and have even attributed attacks by other tigers to Ustad to strengthen the case. Today, the tiger has been tranquilized, and will be ferried away soon. I implore your goodself to take proper action, to prevent the tiger’s relocation. Sadly, if this tiger goes, his two cubs, whom he protects, will soon fall prey to other male tigers encroaching into his territory. Hope you can help Ustad.

Credit —  https://www.change.org

Sign the Petition from here to Save him –  Sign Petition To Save T24

For one, under orders from the Chief Wildlife Warden of Rajasthan, there was an extraordinarily swift response by the Forest Department. Though initially it was presumed that the cat responsible was T72 (Sultan), about 30 minutes after the incident, T24, already under the scanner for three human deaths, was sighted at the exact spot, apparently searching for the body, which had by then been removed. The whole saga started from here. And it opened up massive, emotional debates that polarised wildlife lovers.  – See more at: http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/magazines/conservation/9955-ranthambhores-ustad-saga.html#sthash.OvhUbxX1.dpuf

4_01

Photo By Manjot Singh

‘Ustad’ was branded a ‘man-eater’ after he mauled to death a forest guard on May 8. Within days of the incident, he was drugged and translocated 530 km from Ranthambore to the Udaipur park, considered a rescue centre.

But for the tiger, now caught in transit between his natural habitat and a zoo, a return to the Ranthambore forest, to his female companion and her cubs, is still a long way off. On the brighter side for the big cat, a Vacation Bench, led by Justice A.K. Sikri, has ordered status quo. That means, the tiger stays on at the biological park until the Rajasthan High Court decides his fate. The High Court will hear his case on May 28.

This urgent hearing came on a petition filed by Chandra Bhal Singh, a Pune resident and tiger lover. The hearing itself was a rare gesture from the Supreme Court, which only considers urgent matters during the summer break. Mr. Singh, through counsel Sanjay Upadhyay and Salik Shafique, said ‘Ustad’ had only acted in self-defence when the guard trespassed into his territory.

The tiger, he said, had merely acted to protect his family. His absence from the tiger reserve spelt danger to the tigress and the cubs left helpless in the wild, he said.

He blamed the National Tiger Conservation Authority for acting in haste, under pressure of public opinion and without conducting any scientific probe or understanding the circumstances of the attack.

Credit — http://www.thehindu.com/

WE SIGNED: “KING OF RANTHAMBORE” DYING IN A ZOO, UNABLE TO PROTECT CUBS – RETURN TIGER T24 TO THE WILD!

Request to sign the petition — Sign The Petition To Return T24 To Wild

nature galaxy cases for sale

Advertisements

Hola Mohalla – The Sikh Culture

Hola Mohalla or Hola Mahalla or simply Hola is a Sikh festival that takes place on the first of the lunar month of Chet which usually falls inMarch. This, by a tradition established by Guru Gobind Singh, follows the Hindu festival of Holi by one day; Hola is the masculine form of the feminine sounding Holi.

The word “Mohalla” is derived from the Arabic root hal (alighting, descending) and is a Punjabi word that implies an organized procession in the form of an army column. But unlike Holi, when people playfully sprinkle colored powder, dry or mixed in water, on each other, the Guru made Hola Mohalla an occasion for the Sikhs to demonstrate their martial skills in simulated battles.

Together the words “Hola Mohalla” stands for “mock fight”. During this festival, processions are organised in the form of army type columns accompanied by war-drums and standard-bearers and proceeding to a given spot or moving in state from one gurdwara to another. The custom originated in the time of Guru Gobind Singh who held the first such mock fight event at Anandpur in February 1701.

nature metal prints and nature metal art for sale

Kesgarh Sahib Anadpur Sahib Photo By Manjot Singh

Holla Mohalla festival, Photo:Reuters/Kamal Kishore

Background

Panj Pyara leading a march (Photo:www.bbc.co.uk)

 

Panj Pyara leading a march (Photo:www.bbc.co.uk

The foothills of the Shivaliks in Ropar district of Punjab‘s north-eastern region, especially around the historic townships of Anandpur Sahib andKiratpur Sahib, have, since 1701 been playing host to Hola Mohalla. Recently, the Indian government accorded it the status of a national festival. The military exercise, which was personally supervised by the guru, was carried out on the bed of the River Charan Ganga with the famous Hindu temple of Mata Naina Devi in the Shivaliks as the backdrop.

This annual festival held at Anandpur Sahib in Punjab and now replicated at other Gurdwaras worldwide was started by the tenth Sikh Guru, as a gathering of Sikhs for military exercises and mock battles on the day following the festival of Holi at Anandpur Sahib. It reminds the people of valour and defence preparedness, concepts dear to the Tenth Guru who was at that time defending the Sikhs from the attacks of the Mughal empire and the hill kings.

3 days of celebrations

On this three-day grand festival, mock battles, exhibitions, display of weapons, etc., are held followed by kirtan, music and poetry competitions. The participants perform daring feats, such as Gatka (mock encounters with real weapons), tent pegging, bareback horse-riding, standing erect on two speeding horses and various other feats of bravery.

There are also a number of Darbars where the Sri Guru Granth Sahib is present and kirtan and religious lectures take place. On the last day a long procession, led by Panj Pyaras, starts from Takhat Keshgarh Sahib, one of the five Sikh religious seats, and passes through various important Gurdwaras like Qila Anandgarh, Lohgarh Sahib, Mata Jitoji and terminates at the Takhat (Keshgarh).

For people visiting Anandpur Sahib, langars (voluntary community kitchens) are organized by the local people as a part of sewa (community service). Raw materials like wheat flour, rice, vegetables, milk and sugar are provided by the villagers living nearby. Women volunteer to cook and others take part in cleaning utensils and other manual tasks that need to be carried out. Traditional cuisine is served to the pilgrims who eat while sitting in rows on the ground. (Pangat)

The Festival of Hola Mahalla

(Based on an article by M S. Ahluwalia)

An enlightened person has no identification. Their values are universal and in tune with the timeless state of existence. This timeless state of existence can be given any name like Akal Purukh, God, Raam, Rahim, Hari, Parmaatma etc. But these names point to the same ultimate truth. It is useless to worship any name unless it becomes your own experience.

In our own times, developing countries like India have brought tourism into the forefront, owing to the twin advantages of employment generation and capacity to earn foreign exchange. Recent studies, however, have also pointed out the negative effects such as the cultural erosion (of ones own identity), materialism, increase in crime, social conflicts, overcrowding (of the tourists?) and environmental deterioration, which have not only proved counter productive in some cases but have also led to strong opposition, especially in the case of the sexual based-tourism as has developed in Tailand and other under-developed countries, including even India (which involves profit seeking adults enslaving the young and innocent children of many ‘third world countries”. The only remedial measures to this is the strict adherence to the development of community/religious tourism and its allied branches.

In this brief paper an attempt is made to study the prospects and impact of community/religious tourism and its potential to develop and prosper. The case study is related to the Sikh community’s celebrations of Hola Mahalla at Anandpur Sahib (the birth-place of the Khalsa in 1699) in Punjab, an event that coincides with the Indian festival of Holi celebrated all over North India. This study concludes that community oriented tourism, such as ones similar to Hola Mahalla, can bring economic benefits while promoting partnership with others even as we protect the unique Sikh cultural heritage. The paper briefly discusses the history of Hola Mahalla festival, which has been declared a State festival by the Government of Punjab. It also analyses the importance of community tourism and its impact on economic and socio-cultural environment vis-a vis the host community and tourism development.

Details

Street in Anandpur during festivities

 

Street in Anandpur during festivities

Hola Mahalla or simply Hola is a Sikh festival, which takes place on the first of the lunar month of Chet, which usually falls in March. This follows the Hindu festival of Holi; Hola is the masculine form of the feminine noun Holi. Mahalia, derived from the Arabic root hal (alighting, descending), is a Punjabi word that implies an organized procession in the form of an army column accompanied by war drums and standard-bearers, and proceeding to a given location or moving in state from one Gurdwara to another.

This custom originated in the time of Guru Gobind Singh (1666-1708) who held the first march at Anandpur on Chet vadi 1, 1757 Bk (22nd February, 1701). Unlike Holi, when people playfully sprinkle colored powders, dry or mixed in water, on each other the Guru made Hola Mahalla an occasion for the Sikhs to demonstrate their martial skills in simulated battles. This was probably done forestalling a grimmer struggle against the imperial power following the battle of Ninnohgarh in 1700. Holla Mahalla became an annual event held in an open ground near Holgarh, a Fort across the rivulet Charan Ganga, northwest of Anandpur sahib.

The popularity of this festival may be judged from the fact that out of five Sikh public holidays requested by the Khalsa Diwan, of Lahore in 1889, the Government approved only two – Holla Mahalla and the birth anniversary of Guru Nanak. Hola Mahalla is presently the biggest festival at Anandpur. It will be appropriate here to discuss briefly the town and the participants of this festival.
Continue reading

Golden Temple A Symbol Of Spritulism

Harmandir Sahib
Golden Temple On Canvas
The Harmandir Sahib also Darbar Sahib and informally referred to as the Golden Temple is a prominent Sikh Gurdwara located in the city of Amritsar, Punjab, India. It was built by the fifth Sikh guru, Guru Arjan Dev, in the 16th Century.

 
animal prints for sale

Morning Glory

Morning Glory.

“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.”
animal posters for sale

Morning Glory

“It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.”

Photography Prints

nature digital art

Golden Temple A Symbol Of Spritulism

Golden Temple:- The Harmandir Sahib (Punjabi: ਹਰਿਮੰਦਰ ਸਾਹਿਬ, IPA: [həɾməndəɾ sɑhɪb] or IPA: [həɾɪməndəɾ sɑhɪb]) also Darbar Sahib (Punjabi: ਦਰਬਾਰ ਸਾਹਿਬ, IPA: [dəɾbɑɾ sɑhɪb]), also referred to as the Golden Temple, is a prominent Sikh gurdwara located in the city of Amritsar, Punjab (India). Construction of the gurdwara was begun by Guru Ram Das, the fourth Sikh Guru, and completed by his successor, Guru Arjan Dev. In 1604, Guru Arjan Dev completed the Adi Granth, the holy scripture of Sikhism, and installed it in the Gurdwara. In 1634, Guru Hargobind left Amritsar for the Shivalik Hills and for the remainder of the seventeenth century the city and gurdwara was in the hands of forces hostile to the Sikh Gurus. During the eighteenth century, the Harmandir Sahib was the site of frequent fighting between the Sikhs on one side and either Mughal or Afghan forces on the other side and the gurdwara occasionally suffered damage. In the early nineteenth century, Maharaja Ranjit Singh secured the Punjab region from outside attack and covered the upper floors of the gurdwara with gold, which gives it its distinctive appearance and English name of “Golden Temple”.

Golden_temple
Sell Art Online

Art Prints
watercolor canvas prints and watercolor canvas art for sale