Save T 24 Ustad Tiger Of Ranthambore From Captivity

Save T 24 Ustad Tiger Of Ranthambore From Captivity

We need freedom of Ustad

I am blessed with a Ustad’s #T24, I spent time with the Ustad that I can not forget in my life. Who brought me so close to nature,  I never see a gentle like a tiger in its natural habitat, and neither I have ever seen man nor animal . Ustad had nothing to do with anyone, he was just enjoying nature in its fun, and I was able to capture from the eye of my  lens.

Who says Ustad is a man eater. … Unfortunately, greedy people are putting on him allegations. …..

Manjot Singh

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Photo By Manjot Singh

On May 8, 2015, Rampal Saini, a Forest Guard at the Ranthambore Tiger Reserve, Rajashthan, was allegedly mauled and killed by a tiger, while he was patrolling the forest. The killing has been attributed to a male tiger T-24, christened Ustad, though no one saw the tiger commit the act. Some so-called local experts zeroed in on Ustad as the culprit, as he is known to be an aggressive tiger, with a history of previous alleged attacks. Many vested interests want this tiger removed:
1. Ranthambore tiger Reserve sees thousands of pilgrims walking through the park every Wednesday to visit a temple. This brings in a lot of money to local businesses.
2. Illegal grazing, logging, etc cannot continue in the reserve for fear of this aggressive tiger.
3. Someone is instigating the forest guards to strike work, and local leaders are threatening to create a law-and-order problem.
A local committee of so-called experts has persuaded the CM of Rajasthan to release an order for capture and relocation of this magnificent animal to a zoo. They have allegedly informed the CM that the tiger is a man-eater, and have even attributed attacks by other tigers to Ustad to strengthen the case. Today, the tiger has been tranquilized, and will be ferried away soon. I implore your goodself to take proper action, to prevent the tiger’s relocation. Sadly, if this tiger goes, his two cubs, whom he protects, will soon fall prey to other male tigers encroaching into his territory. Hope you can help Ustad.

Credit —  https://www.change.org

Sign the Petition from here to Save him –  Sign Petition To Save T24

For one, under orders from the Chief Wildlife Warden of Rajasthan, there was an extraordinarily swift response by the Forest Department. Though initially it was presumed that the cat responsible was T72 (Sultan), about 30 minutes after the incident, T24, already under the scanner for three human deaths, was sighted at the exact spot, apparently searching for the body, which had by then been removed. The whole saga started from here. And it opened up massive, emotional debates that polarised wildlife lovers.  – See more at: http://www.sanctuaryasia.com/magazines/conservation/9955-ranthambhores-ustad-saga.html#sthash.OvhUbxX1.dpuf

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Photo By Manjot Singh

‘Ustad’ was branded a ‘man-eater’ after he mauled to death a forest guard on May 8. Within days of the incident, he was drugged and translocated 530 km from Ranthambore to the Udaipur park, considered a rescue centre.

But for the tiger, now caught in transit between his natural habitat and a zoo, a return to the Ranthambore forest, to his female companion and her cubs, is still a long way off. On the brighter side for the big cat, a Vacation Bench, led by Justice A.K. Sikri, has ordered status quo. That means, the tiger stays on at the biological park until the Rajasthan High Court decides his fate. The High Court will hear his case on May 28.

This urgent hearing came on a petition filed by Chandra Bhal Singh, a Pune resident and tiger lover. The hearing itself was a rare gesture from the Supreme Court, which only considers urgent matters during the summer break. Mr. Singh, through counsel Sanjay Upadhyay and Salik Shafique, said ‘Ustad’ had only acted in self-defence when the guard trespassed into his territory.

The tiger, he said, had merely acted to protect his family. His absence from the tiger reserve spelt danger to the tigress and the cubs left helpless in the wild, he said.

He blamed the National Tiger Conservation Authority for acting in haste, under pressure of public opinion and without conducting any scientific probe or understanding the circumstances of the attack.

Credit — http://www.thehindu.com/

WE SIGNED: “KING OF RANTHAMBORE” DYING IN A ZOO, UNABLE TO PROTECT CUBS – RETURN TIGER T24 TO THE WILD!

Request to sign the petition — Sign The Petition To Return T24 To Wild

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Spotted Owlet

Spotted Owlet
Calls – Athene brama

Introduction: The Spotted Owlet is a small, white-spotted greyish-brown to brown owl with a round head, yellow eyes and prominent white eyebrows.

[For help with terms used in the description, see parts of an owl. For general characteristics common to most owl species, see owl physiology.]

Description: [Note: following description is for raceindica, nominate race brama is generally darker and smaller] The facial disc is creamy-buff with brown concentric lines. The forehead and lores are white to pale buffy. Eyebrows are white and curved. Eyes are pale to deep golden-yellow. The sides of the face are dark, contrasting with white rear edges. The cere is dusky green or greenish brown, the bill being greenish-horn, but sometimes darker, and somtimes more yellow on the upper ridge. The crown, sides of the head, and upperparts are earth-brown to greyish or rufescent, marked with small white spots. The nape has very large white spots, forming a collar, while the back has large white spots, and the scapulars have broad white edges. The chin, throat, and front and sides of the neck are white, with a dark brown band below this. The remainder of the underparts are whitish, spotted and mottled with brown, sometimes with broken bars.
The wings are spotted and banded white, and the tail has narrow white bars.
The tarsi is feathered, and the toes bristled and dirty yellowish. Claws are dark horn, and soles yellowish.

Size: Length 19-21cm. Wing length 143-171mm. Tail length 65-93mm. Weight 110-114g. females usually larger than males.

Habits: Generally crepuscular and nocturnal, but sometimes seen by day. Roosts by day in tree hole or on a branch. May roost in pairs or small groups. Flight is deeply undulating, consisting of a few rapid flaps followed by a glide with wings pressed to the body.

Voice: A harsh screeching chirurrr-chirurrr-chirurrr…followed by, or alternating with cheevak, cheevak, cheevak and a variety of other screeches and chuckles.

Hunting & Food: Mainly preys upon beetles, moths and other insects. Also takes earthworms, lizards, mice and small birds. Usually hunts from a perch, pouncing on prey, but occasionally takes insects in flight. Often uses street lamps as hunting bases, hawking insects attracted to the lights.

Breeding: Northern races breed from February to April, while Southern races breed from November to March. Nests are in natural tree hollows, or in holes and cavaties in human dwellings. May also nest in cavities in the sides of ravines and earth cliffs when suitable trees are scarce. The nest is sometimes liked with grass and feathers.
3-5, sometimes 5 white, roundish oval eggs are laid (average 32.2 x 27.1mm), with incubation begining with the first egg. This causes the young to hatch asynchronously, resulting in a considerable size difference within the brood.

Habitat: Open or semi-open country, including semi-desert. Within and on outskirts of villages and cultivation, groves with old trees, and ruins. This species avoids thick forest. Lives from sea-level to about 1400m.

Distribution: Southern Asia, from Iran to Vietnam. Present on most of the Indian subcontinent (except Sri Lanka) and Southeast Asia, except peninsular Thailand and Malaysia.

Distribution of the Spotted Owlet Athene brama

Status: Generally common.

Original Description: Temminck, Coenraed Jacob & Laugier de Chartrouse, (Baron) Meiffren. 1821. Nouveau recueil de planches coloriées d’oiseau pour servir de suite et de complément aux planches enluminées de Buffon, livraison 12, pl. 68.

Subspecies: A. b. brama, A. b. indica, A. b. mayri, A. b. albida, A. b. pulchra, A. b. ultra

Photo credit Manjot Singh
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Morning Glory #Photography at ArtistRising.com

Morning Glory Photography at ArtistRising.com.

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Chital Or Spotted Deer Nursing her fawn

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The chital’s coat is pinkish fawn, marked with white spots, and its underparts are also white. Its antlers, which it sheds annually, are usually three-pronged and curve in a lyre shape and may extend to 75 cm (2.5 ft). Compared to the hog deer, its close relative, the chital has a more cursorial build. It also has a more advanced morphology with antler pedicles being proportionally short and its auditory bullae being smaller. It also has large nasals. The male chital averages about 90 cm (35 in) tall at the shoulder, with a total length of 170 cm (67 in), including a 20 cm (7.9 in). Males, at a typical weight of 30 to 75 kg (66 to 170 lb), are a somewhat larger than females, at 25 to 45 kg (55 to 99 lb). Exceptionally large males can weigh up to 98 to 110 kg (220 to 240 lb). The lifespan is around 8–14 years.
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